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House Repairs Not to Neglect

In this economy, you may be tempted to delay or even skip minor home maintenance repairs, cleaning jobs and inspections in your home. But don’t be penny-wise and dollar-foolish. That $200 or $300 you save today could result in expenditures of $3,000 or even tens of thousands next month or next year if hidden problems in your home go unnoticed and become worse.

Consider coughing up a little dough to take care of these small jobs before they morph into gigantic, expensive jobs later.

Annual HVAC Inspection

Cost: $200-$300, depending on where you live.

How often: at least once a year.

When: spring or fall. Heating, ventilation and air conditioning, or HVAC, companies aren’t as busy, and you’re not in dire need of heat or air conditioning.

What an inspection might find:

The furnace blower is not working properly. Cost to repair or replace: $300-$500. Possible consequence of letting it go: a broken heat exchanger. Potential savings down the road: $300-$1,000 to replace the heat exchanger or $750-$3,500, depending on the energy efficiency, to replace indoor or outdoor furnace components.

The reversing switch in the heat pump is broken. Cost to repair or replace: $100-$300. Letting it go results in no heat from the heat pump, and the system switches to a more expensive auxiliary heat. Potential savings: lower heating bills.

Bottom line: “Things that happen often happen at the worst possible time in the worse possible conditions and you’re looking at the maximum rate. Remember, continual maintenance prolongs the life of the equipment. “You’re sitting there with an investment of thousands in your HVAC system and you’re investing a few hundred dollars in maintenance.”

Chimney Inspection

Cost: $65 for an inspection; $150 for inspection and cleaning, including removal of creosote buildup, which may lead to a chimney fire.

How often: once a year.

When: before your first fire in winter.

What an inspection might find:

There’s no chimney cap. Cost to add: $150. If you let it go, rain water can get into your chimney, damage the chimney liner and damper, and even saturate mortar joints — causing mold. Potential savings: $2,000-$4,000 to replace the chimney liner.

Other problems may include: a cracked chimney crown, which can be repaired for $300-$500; chimney flashing that needs caulking, which can be done for $80-$100; and waterproofing the exterior brick, $350-$600. All these fixes will prevent rainwater from getting in and mold from forming.

Bottom line: “A simple chimney cleaning can prevent chimney fires and damage to your entire house.

Termite Inspection

Cost: $75-$200 for an inspection; $200-$300 for a termite protection contract for qualifying homes with no current evidence of termites to cover treatment and repairs for any later infestation.

How often: once a year.

When: any time, although termites are more active in spring and early summer.

An inspection might find subterranean termites that come from the ground or flying termites. If left untreated, these bugs damage framing, trim, drywall, furniture, carpet, copper and other soft metals. Termites cause more than $5 billion in damages a year in the U.S.The average homeowner loss for termite damage is $3,000, but losses can be as high as $30,000 or even $80,000. Most homeowners insurance does not cover repair of termite damage.

Bottom line: “Termites eat the wood from the inside out”. “A typical homeowner would not be aware they are even in their home until months or years after they get in and start causing damage. A lot of people don’t realize that termites don’t just feed on the home. They’ll eat flooring, insulation, books — I’ve even seen them penetrate through swimming pool liners.”

Power Washing and Sealing Wood Deck

Cost: $100-$300 for a 200-square-foot deck, more for a larger deck.

How often: every one to three years, depending on the amount of traffic, moss and mold.

When: any time in sunny weather.

Power washing gets rid of stains, algae, mold, mildew and moss. Algae and mold can make your deck slippery and dangerous. Sealing your deck after it is cleaned helps prevent water damage. Wood soaks up rain like a sponge, expands and then shrinks. Sealing makes the water bead up and roll off. And let’s not forget — your deck will look nicer, too.

If you let it go, your deck will warp, nails will pop out and the deck won’t last as long.
Potential savings: $4,000 to $20,000 or more to replace your deck, depending on size.
Bottom line: “A properly cleaned and sealed wood deck can last 20 to 30 years.
Dryer Vent Cleaning

Cost: $120-$200.

How often: every year.

When: a sunny day.

The purpose is to get rid of lint buildup. If your dryer is not on an exterior wall, it’s likely that the vent leading outside is clogged up.

If you ignore it, the result could be a disastrous fire. “Once the vent gets clogged, the dryer starts overheating and it can catch on fire. “Dryer fires are very dangerous.”

Potential savings: your home, your furnishings, your belongings and your life.

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